Archive for the Internet World Category

China’s Connectivity Revolution – Stephen S. Roach – Project Syndicate

Posted in Internet World on January 27, 2012 by thomas4infosoc

China’s Connectivity Revolution – Stephen S. Roach – Project Syndicate.

“Filtered or not, a long-fragmented China now has a viable and rapidly expanding network. The power of that network – especially insofar as economic, social, and political change is concerned – is hard to predict. But connectivity adds a new dimension of cohesion to modern China. That can only accelerate the speed of its extraordinary development journey.”

Investing in China Internet Companies? Gimme Something Useful. | China Hearsay

Posted in etctetera, Internet World on December 1, 2011 by thomas4infosoc

Investing in China Internet Companies? Gimme Something Useful. | China Hearsay.

Interesting look into some reasons that could keep you from doing internet business in China. Links to an original Article on China Business Insider: http://www.businessinsider.com/8-things-to-know-investing-chinese-internet-companies-2011-10?op=1

Turkey Backs off Tighter Internet Controls – Information Policy

Posted in Internet World, News Clip on August 18, 2011 by thomas4infosoc

 

 

 

 

Sitting in China, one easily forgets about other area’s internet troubles, let’s take Turkey for example:

Turkey Backs off Tighter Internet Controls – Information Policy.

 

China’s Early Stage Ecosystem

Posted in Internet World on July 22, 2011 by thomas4infosoc

China’s Early Stage Ecosystem [Slideshare].

Chris Evdemon, GM of Incubation Programs at InnovationWorks, has updated his excellent presentation on China’s Early Stage Ecosystem about China’s trends, technologies, financing, and InnovationWorks itself.

Chinese film director hits out at state censorship | World news | The Guardian

Posted in Internet World on June 26, 2011 by thomas4infosoc

Chinese film director hits out at state censorship | World news | The Guardian.

Another contribution to the perennial debate about 1) the reasons for the generally very poor quality of Chinese movies, 2) the question whether an age classification system would be an effective remedy, and 3) Jia Zhangke, still the most interesting among the professional movie directors working in China today.

China’s Digital Consumers : China Law Blog : China Law for Business

Posted in etctetera, Internet World on May 8, 2011 by thomas4infosoc

China’s Digital Consumers : China Law Blog : China Law for Business.

The great China Law Blog points to the latest edition of McKinsey Quarterly, which is looking at the Chinese Digital Consumer. Just your pot of tea, right?

HKIRC Officially Launches Full Chinese .香港 Domain Name

Posted in Internet World on March 29, 2011 by thomas4infosoc

at last… what took them so long?

HKIRC Officially Launches Full Chinese .香港 Domain Name | Domain News, Videos and Domain Blogs.

 

Gmail issues surface

Posted in etctetera, Information Security, Internet World, News Clip on March 15, 2011 by thomas4infosoc

Gmail issues surface in China as LinkedIn admits to Great Firewall uncertainty | Asian Correspondent.

The thing is: everything is crawling these days: the streets are jammed rather with security guards than with cars, the internet is jammed with people surveying it rather than those who want or even need to use it. Functionality seems to stand in line behind paranoia once more. As many corporate or also government mail systems are not reliable, bringing Gmail to its knees does not only affect private users, but is actually detrimental to all those who use it instead of their office account because of the usually much higher reliability and security standards.

New Draft Internet Regulations: MIIT Bites Off More Than It Can Chew | China Hearsay

Posted in Internet World, Telecoms Policy on March 4, 2011 by thomas4infosoc

What kind of regulation is this? Following the battle between Tencent and 360, it seems the draft for a new regulation fostering internet civility and harmony includes the outlawing of “Offering products that are incompatible with competitors’ products without reasonable grounds or authority;”

This is the opposite of what is right, and it shows how dangerous it can be to study international best practice without really understanding it. There can be reasons for intervening with the authority of companies to whatever the hell they want, but it is not the companies who have to justify doing what they want (create incompatibility, for example). It is the obligation of a market regulator to show why intervention is justified, why forcing two companies to offer compatible products is important enough for the greater good of the economy and society that it is justified to eliminate market mechanisms.

Is this form of compulsory harmonisation justified in the case of anti-virus and online chat software? I do not know, and neither does MIIT, because they never checked with this market-oriented approach in mind.

Guys, this is the only market area in China that does not have a history of state-ownership-induced inefficiencies. There is no need to catch up with that part of history!

 

an analysis of the draft regulation can be found at China Hearsay:  New Draft Internet Regulations: MIIT Bites Off More Than It Can Chew | China Hearsay.

OECD: Egypt’s Shutdown Of Net Was Costly

Posted in Internet World, News Clip on March 3, 2011 by thomas4infosoc

This is what I just saw at TechDailyDose:

Preliminary figures released Thursday by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development showed that Egypt’s decision to block Internet services for five days cost the country an estimated $90 million. The OECD said the blocked telecommunications and Internet services accounted for about 3 percent to 4 percent of the country’s gross domestic product, which accounted for about $18 million a day.

What’s interesting about this is:

that figure is terrifyingly low. Can it really be that cutting a whole nation off from electronic communications networks only affects the companies so marginally? I think this calls for a decent modelling approach by serious economists and business people. They together should not just calculate the sales lost in e-commerce and other direct transactions (it is possible that this is how the figures came about). A typical company of medium size depends in many respects on IP traffic of all sorts: you cannot control your work stream, you do not have access to many of your data (because some may be stored in cloud services, others just in off-site data centers), you cannot make an offer to a customer because you do not have a website where to check the current exchange rate or your banking swift code, many people probably could not even make a phone call, as so many voice services also require the use of the very IP networks that have been kill-switched (or whatever the special term for network lunacy is). I can only personally judge from what happened when the sea quake ripped the undersea cable off Taiwan to shreds: mainland China and Hongkong was playing Sudoku (the newspaper version, apparently, not the online version) for weeks around Christmas 2006 (or was it 2005?).

If cutting off a country from the communications networks comes so cheap, I suggest to do it once a week, because it’s really good for family life!

OECD: Egypt’s Shutdown Of Net Was Costly – Tech Daily Dose.